Gaming without your brother

Tag Archives: Xbox 360

I thought before I typed this up, I should check out the Wikipedia page, see if anything about the developer stood out to me that could be a better talking point than just writing up how much I did or didn’t like the game (because I know this game is ages old and me talking about it now is poor form). This is a quote from the Wikipedia entry for this game: “He [the developer] did not expect it to be a success, and that he was ‘half-expecting it to fail for being too stupid of a game.'”

Despite his concerns, this game is dirt cheap and a good time so you should definitely pick it up. Aside from that, I’m going to touch on, once again, how much I love indie games. You’re welcome.

You know why indie developers are great? Because they just wake up one morning (might have been years ago, before all of their incredibly dedicated, hard work, but all the same! it started one random morning) and decided, “This idea is awesome. I’m going to make it myself because it will be awesome. If no one else thinks it’s awesome, that’s too bad, but at least it was awesome to me.” I think I love this mindset (or that I’m particularly a sucker for it) because I’m so the opposite. I get defeated so easily (see: my track record on this blog . . . ) and never have confidence in my own creativity. Actually scratch that. I have a lot of confidence that some of my ideas are pure gold – I also just recognize the amount of effort they’d take to execute and I give up before I begin. So when one dude decides he’s going to make a game out in Microsoft XNA and assumes it’s going to be too stupid to even make him any money so he sells it for $1, and then it becomes an underground favorite – yeah. I love that guy, and all of his aspirations. Having said that, I never played his other game The Dishwasher: Dead Samurai, but all the same! He’s a boss. Cheers to you, Mr. James Silva. Live your dreams, and long live the dreams of all indie developers everywhere.

Speaking of indie developers! My friend made this game called Cyber Heist for his senior thesis/project in a video games development-centric Master’s program and that is awesome that he is in it, and it exists. The game is getting crazy hype and he is getting crazy hype and I couldn’t be more over the moon for him and his cohorts working on the game. Although the premise is tongue in cheek (hackers trying to get into the system to erase all of their student debt), the idea of the second player and first player having complete different gameplay experiences is . . . fairly novel. I can’t think of another game that does that besides Wii U games (people with the Wii U controller in New Super Mario Bros Wii U for example, place jumping blocks anywhere on the screen, and don’t control a character). Comment! Correct me with examples, because I’m sure I’m wrong.

Speaking more about indie games! Tripleslash, the team that made Magnetic By Nature (which I am in love with), is releasing a full version of the game in the next few months. Details seem a little sparse on any official outlet, but it looks like the fully-funded Kickstarter plans on delivering a newly polished, full version in Q3 of 2014 on PC, Linux, and Mac OS. I’m also pretty sure the “Ultimate” version on the official website is for the new, upcoming release, even though the demo video still shows the gameplay of the $1 title on the Xbox Live Indie Aracde (still great, by the way).

Anyway. You know me and indie devs. I’m just a regular fangirl, droolin’ all over people makin’ moves and fulfillin’ dreams without corporate backing. I love you indie devs. Get it, girls.

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Credit to flickr user netzkobold

Credit to flickr user netzkobold

Shortly after posting my blog yesterday, I bit the bullet and read a really brief synopsis of the release event. The only thing I can say might be good or bad that I can’t tell yet is the controller re-design. I think the Xbox controller is the most ergonomic and best designed controller in the history of gaming peripherals. Messing with that recipe makes me hesitant, but it looks good so . . . here’s hoping. Coming with Kinect seems cool. I have heard that voice commands, when they work properly (eyeroll), are very fun and really add something to the gaming experience. I also enjoy niche party games like Dance Central, so making Kinect better seems really cool to me. Also, I don’t have the hardware design. Boxy, sure, and bigger (which blows), but kind of utilitarian, and minimalistic, which I love. So hey! I don’t hate everything!

The lack of backwards compatibility is unsurprising to me; upping hardware specs will always eventually lead to that. What was saddening was the complete lack of an ATTEMPT to help gamers get their old content. And for the first time since my brother bought the original Playstation when I was in the third grade, I have a desire to purchase Sony hardware. When it was announced that the PS4 would not be backwards compatible, Sony conceded to their fans and said they would make some cloud space available for gamers old software. When asked point blank if Microsoft would do the same thing in the future, the Microsoft employee said no. ಠ_ಠ

From what I can gather, essentially used games are getting an added fee to play? A small, very quiet, optimistic part of my heart wonders if this will prompt GameStop to reduce used game prices (which frankly, I feel like are still too close to new game prices). Most of me realizes that this is just another way for Microsoft to stuff more green in their pockets. And it’s sad. But I do slightly get it. SLIGHTLY. People are always just trying to get money, and while it’s mostly helping Microsoft (it sounds like), it will slightly help developers. And I’m always all for that.

I really got the saddest bit of news this morning. Indie developers won’t be able to self-publish on the Xbox One. My literal facial expression when reading that can only be described as aghast. The hits of the past few years like Limbo, Braid, Fez, etc. won’t be able to reach an audience from the Xbox One. My heart . . . And I know what you’re going to say, that they have other avenues, it’s good they should just release on PC, etc. etc. etc. It’s undeniable though the audience that those devs reached by going through Xbox Arcade Live was massive. At the end of the day, for me, I recognize that every dev needs to eat, and I want people that are passionately following their dreams to get the most exposure they possibly can. Microsoft just cut off one really wide avenue for devs to be able to do that. A single tear rolls down my cheek.

What does this mean for me? Still nothing, like I highlighted yesterday. I now have a PC gaming rig that I’m in love with, and with games being cheaper through Steam, GOG.com, GamersGate, and other online distributors than new physical discs, buying Xbox games are completely unnecessary  And really, I still have a great 360 that’ll last for awhile, so hopefully I’ll still be able to get in on any Xbox exclusives (I’M LOOKING AT YOU, ROCKSTAR, COUGHREDDEADREDEMPTIONTWOCOUGH). But it is interesting to me the differences between the Xbox One and the PS4. It’s making Sony very tempting to me, if for no other reason than voting with my dollar about how much better I think the PS4 grand entrance/innovations (air quotes, because both are pretty lackluster improvements for supposedly next-gen hardware) were than the Xbox One event.

Rant with me in the comments! I haven’t really read any defense of the Xbox One. I mean, usually you get at least one outlet being like “Now, now, this is actually cool” but pretty much across the board of all the major news outlets I read were disparaging about the poor showing. Do you want to defend? Do you want to fuel the rage? Comment!


Just call me controversial Cathy.

The perhaps most acknowledged/blatant reason is because I don’t have the money to buy whatever they’re selling. But even then, there are probably a lot of fans who are anxiously looking forward to the press event while knowing the won’t be buying this console for another few years at least. Tying into this reason: I just bought my Xbox 360 about a year and a half ago, it’s still in tip-top shape, I’m not replacing it any time soon even if I had the money.

I think my true source of apathy about the whole thing is a) overhype (I’m just a contrary human being so when people say “Be excited about this!” I instantly am not excited) and b) how great can this new hardware be? I highly doubt there will be anything groundbreaking in whatever is coming in this new box. Beefier hardware specs, a Blu-ray player, probably some cool integration features with Windows 8, Windows Media Player, and Windows Phone, but I don’t own any of those products. I think that’s all we’re going to see today. Cooler motion sensing? Great. Not something I have the space to use right now, but on an unexcited level, I can appreciate how that can lead to cooler peripherals/gaming experiences.

Partly this apathy must come from playing more on my PC as well. It’s beefier, games are cheaper, I have plenty of screen real estate, etc. etc. I don’t need a console, although the network is fun for playing with non-PC gaming friends. Also gaming on the couch instead of my office chair.

POST SCRIPT: Whoops, took too long to post this. It’s the Xbox One! Cool name, better than the 720. The depths of my apathy is that I’m not even going to read what they’re saying about it. I haven’t read any hypotheses of what will be in it either. Lazy, lazy, lazy, lazy, lazy.


Castle Crashers was released in 2008 but went on sale for cheap (cheaper than usual) two weeks ago (and really probably had before now but I just never noticed). My brother had recommended it to me as a fun game when he bought it ages ago and he told me about it being on sale so I figured now was the time to take action and finally give it a whirl.

Look at those bad-a knights!

Look at those bad-a knights!

Right off the bat, how can you not love this game? The cartoon-y style by Dan Paladin is endearing and entertaining. The music too is classic questing music with big booms and trumpets and all that you want to hear behind you when swinging a sword and casting a spell. Aside from the aesthetics alone, the animation is lovable. These little bad-a’s aren’t just running around in 2D, they’re glaring and smoochin’ ladies and choppin’ heads. It’s almost dark, but not quite, and that makes it that much more fun.

As I started playing, I realized how static the gameplay was. I was just supposed to be mashing these buttons for how many stages? Sure, there are combos to unlock, and I will say this is one of the few games that I actually take advantage of magical abilities (I’m usually a fan of pure brute force: never use block, never level agility, never press brake), but for the most part,  jump and slash. I’m playing through the first time as the Red Knight, so I’m really just busting heads in with maces and blunt objects. I even tried to branch out and try the other mini games offered (the Arena and All You Can Quaff) but alas, those required even less thought than the game itself! You level up every two levels at least but usually every level. Bosses rarely require anything special, just a few more stat points and a little less jumping right into their attacks, and then you can easily win.

And then last weekend, I was sitting around, thinking how much effort jumping into any of my puzzle or RPG games would take. I found myself looking for something that would take no thought, that would give me a sense of accomplishment when really there was nothing required of me. And I started up Castle Crashers. How can I fault a game for delivering exactly what it advertises? A side-scrolling beat-em-up game that only cost me $6 and makes me laugh with subtle animations and goofy bosses. Sometimes you need that in the middle of games that make you cry or pee your pants in fright or think so hard you rage quit. Castle Crashers is truly relaxing gaming, and I love it for giving me that.

Conclusion?

PLAY THIS GAME!

Need to make a better, solidified graphic for this conclusion . . . but I like the joy on this kid’s face.